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Donald R. Breeland
Memorial Service

~ 24NOV12 ~

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Eulogy delivered by Gene Breeland: click here


Memorial Service Card:
24NOV12 Memorial Service Card

24NOV12 Memorial Service Card
Printable Memorial Service Card: click here

photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
 
photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
 
photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
 
photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
 
photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
 
photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
 
photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
 


EULOGY

DONALD RAY BREELAND

delivered by Gene Breeland


Donald Ray Breeland, AKA "Peanut Butter", was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, August 26, 1946; died Sacramento, California, October 27, 2012. Those dates are statistics and nothing more than sign posts of a man's entrance and departure in life. The real man lived between those sign posts. He was born as you were born, he lived as you now live; and for his many days enjoyed his possessions, his power, and his pleasures. But a man's life is more than the accumulation of money, influence, and possessions. The true legacy of a man is how well he related and interacted with his fellow man. Don was an Odd Fellow as well as a Clamper, and in Odd Fellowship we are taught that a man may have a rough unseemingly appearance, but a good true heart within; while another being of captivating manner and style may be totally devoid of all true human virtue. Don certainly fit the first category.

Don was the maverick of the family. At an early age he developed a love for the great outdoors, for hunting, fishing, and camping. Neither his brother Jim nor I held those same interests; Jim liked three things, cars, auto racing, and television; me, everything I liked was either illegal, immoral, or fattening. I guess it was no wonder that our mother thought that I was the one whose moral development needed watching lest I do something to embarrass the family. She figured you can't get into a whole lot of trouble in front of the TV or out in the woods. Yet while there were differences we had a functional family with love and respect.

Don grew up with an intense love of his Country. He served ten years in the United States Navy, and seven years in the National Guard (one year in Oklahoma, and six in California). His career in the Navy took him for a tour in Viet Nam where he earned a Bronze Star with Valor, and a Purple Heart. His naval career took him around the world and was the source of many stories told around the camp fire, stories that endeared him to many.

He had an intense thirst for knowledge, and good twelve year old, single malt, scotch. That thirst for knowledge led him to become a scholar of the Civil War. We had many discussions about his research and findings. He was also a student of the Federal Constitution, and the only man that I ever knew that read all of the "Federalist Papers". His knowledge of these writings often made me go searching for information to confirm what we discussed, and more often than not, he was right.

Don was married once in his life, and told me on more than one occasion that he was glad that it produced no children. He felt that his life style was not one that made for a good relationship with any woman on a 24/7 basis. Not that he didn't like the ladies, but he didn't want one cluttering his life. Don wanted his time to be his and no one else's. He always said that he wanted nothing to interfere with his clamping.

Don became a member of E Clampus Vitus in 1972 while on leave from the Navy. He took to the members and the organization immediately, and upon his separation from active duty made clamping a passion. He always told me that in spite of everything else that he would always have time and money for clamping, and as you Brothers know, he was true to that word. His career and dedication to E Clampus Vitus is a matter of record, but he was also a member of other organization; a life member of the VFW, the Disabled Veterans of America, the Eagles, and finally a year and one half age he took his four degrees of Odd Fellowship.

Don and I held many conversations about his place in the world, and agreed that he may well be one of those people who had the misfortune of being born in the wrong century. He said many occasions that he would have been happier living in the 19th century so he could track, hunt, trap, and live off the land unencumbered by rules and regulations.

He had a family that loved him, though they at times did not understand him because of his life style, but they are here to bid him farewell along with me.

And now as I close, I want all who have a drink in your hand to toast the man that we knew as "Peanut Butter".

Rest well Brother.


photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
 
photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
 
photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
  photograph by Russell Holder
... photograph by Russell Holder
 

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